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Sally Jackson Goat Cheese with Vine Leaves (Ceased Production)

Producer
Sally Jackson Cheeses
Country
United States
Region
Washington
Size
4-5 ins diameter, 1-2 ins high
Weight
2-3 lbs
Website
www.sallyjacksoncheeses.com
Milk
Goat
Classification
Semi Soft
Rennet
Animal
Rind
Leaf Wrapped

Located on 140 acres of remote farmland in the Okanagon Highlands in eastern Washington, Sally and Roger Jackson raise a small number of sheep, goats, and cows, using their milk for farmstead cheese production.

Having initially sold their cheeses just in Washington state, their business has grown over the years and limited quantities of cheese are now shipped to various locations around the United States.

Cheesemaking takes place in the small, detached make room on the farm. Milk is heated in a large pot over a wood burning stove which sits in a corner of the room. Adjacent is an area used for storing the chestnut and vine leaves that have become synonymous with Sally Jackson's cheeses. The sheep's and cow's milk versions are wrapped in chestnut leaves, while the goat cheese is wrapped in vine leaves, all of which are gathered by hand from a local chestnut grove where the vines grow around the perimeter. The leaves are soaked in alcohol prior to wrapping, both to give the leaves flexibility and to impart flavor to the cheeses.

Wrapped in leaves and tied with string, Sally's cheeses are instantly recognizable for their rustic appearance. Unnamed, the sheep's and goat's milk versions are simply referred to as Sally Jackson's Sheep's/Goat's Milk Cheese Wrapped in Chestnut/Vine Leaves. The cow's milk version is known as Renata, named after one of Sally's cows.

Milk for the goat's milk cheese comes from Sally's herd of mostly Alpine and Nubian goats.

Cheeses are made in a distinctive hexagonal shape and have a bone-white interior, offset by the vivid green of the vine leaves.

The texture is smooth, silky and yet dense, becoming softer with age. Flavors are clean and bright, with citrus notes and a lemony tang, while at the same time being earthy and cellar-like.

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